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CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 1:00pm EDT
iran." this interview is part of booktv's college series, it was recorded at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland. >> host: john limbert, in your book, "negotiaing with iran", wrestling with the ghost of history, you talk about two crises in iranian history. what are those for crises? >> guest: two of them are actually prerevolution. two of them are post- revolution. the first was the crisis over the north west iran in area after world war ii. many people believe that that is where the cold war actually started. the second was the whale crisis of 1951 and 1953. in which the iranians attempted to exert control over major economic resources and the effort was frustrated in part because of a cia sponsored coup against the iranian national leader. the second occurred after the islamic revolution. the first was something that i was involved in personally. which is the hostage crisis in 1979 until 1981. the second was the crisis involving the hostages -- american and others -- those held in lebanon during the 1980s. a part of that, it was an incident that touched this institution he
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 1:00am EDT
fighting for its life against nazi germany. the u.s. joined in that occupation after the u.s. joined the war and the russians did not leave as they had agreed to do it and instead set up a separatist movement in the northwest which first demanded autonomy from iran. that crisis was the first item on the docket of the newly formed united nations and of the first five resolutions of the security council starting in january of 1946. three of the five involve iran and azerbaijan. >> what role did the cia played in iran in the 1950's? >> well, peter, that's a good question. i don't have many details. many pyrenean friends of mine think i know more about the operations than i do of the cia. people argue over this endlessly what we do know is that the early 1953 president eisenhower inherited a difficult situation from president truman and gave the order to plan an operation inside iran to bring down prime minister mohsen def and to replace him with someone believed to be more in accordance with our interest. >> so did the prime minister get replaced and did the schulman get through on at t
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 7:00pm EDT
in a dramatic way. i started to see it as early as 2006, and the reason is this. in -- after the u.s. invasion of iraq which syria posed, and syria was turning a blind eye cannot help but the hottest, there is a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say that that there are next on the hit list so there would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level official told me the wrong, of course were helping. you know why? we wanted you guys to kill them. we don't want them in our country. when you survive that, particularly after the assassination, that was blamed on syria but most of the national community. the pressure just escalated exponentially after that. people work in late 2005 counting the days for the gasol regime. syrian expatriates, organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that. in that thing that really created in him a sense of triumph and some and survivalism that very much informed his view of the world and response to the uprising in march 2011 because it instill then him the sense of destiny, righteousness,
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 2:00pm EDT
vulnerable to a critique of morals. throughout the first quarter century of u.s. independence, britain and america chased each other about questions of population. it's optimization. even as white americans claim to need enslaved africans and african-americans to people of the labor force coveted to support ever-growing numbers of the nation's people. on the continent, the british continued to cultivate diplomatic and economic ties with native americans supporting the petition from whom the united states received the greatest threat to read on the ocean burton kunkel atlantic shipping forbidding the atlantic slave trade after 1807 and harassing u.s. merchants vessels. meanwhile burton's traditional goals population limitations because usually the british fought on their small islands of their main worry was too many people. but on the seas the navy needed every hand it could find on deck avoiding the american ships provoked enormous controversy. more so since the efforts could sweep americans into british mess. in the midst of such moral and political confusion both americans and the briti
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
in the u.s. attorney scandal, said my 22 million e-mails were deleted and these are all government documents and they have never been found. so that was one thing he seems to have gotten away with. another thing was in 2004, smart tag played a central role in the presidential election. the secretary of each state, a part of their job is to oversee an impartial election. you may recall kathleen harris in florida was secretary of state of florida and she also haven't played a central role in the bush election and there is considerable controversy over that. well, a very similar thing happened in ohio in 2004, where ken blackwell was secretary of state. and again, he was supposed to oversee a fair and impartial election. but he happened to be cochaired the bush cheney reelection committee. he decided to tabulate the return for the 2004 election was secretary of state's computers weren't enough than they needed to get another set of computer service. so who did he go to both smart tack. smart tax roll raises an amount of very interesting questions. i went through the returns as deeply
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 8:30pm EDT
is the canopy, you know, which in the u.s. economy is the big firms, ge, gm, wal-mart, all of that, and then you is the scrub, the small business, but it's the small and growing, it's the things that were small, but can challenge the big, and it's what happens when the big tree falls over, and we've been to the rain forest, and new trees grow right out of the old tree; right? it's a metaphor, but it's real. when we lose something big in the economy, it's vital we know how to recon figure resources and create something new out of it. do we need control? we need feedback loops. we need the capability to repurpose. in this country, we need a robust platform for people to realize what they have inside of them. that's why people came to the country, and that's why people hear, look for a better future that will be like the better future their ancestors who lived here when they came so, you know, i would say, yes, you know. we need control, but we need control -- interdependencies, regulations, understanding what's happening, what's working, what's not, where do we want to go, and what g
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 1:15am EDT
. -- mother. hot to rethink u.s. big brother or little brother both of the constitution's are based on magnet card up. one day you will wake up to say i am just like my parents. >> very comprehensive. [laughter] and i school was voted most likely to be comprehensive. >> we have an oil problem but how does one attics oil help another attics get over its problem? >> let us reiterate that after reassume the presidency we will then turn it around to make it ourselves in mike will fix a couple of these but short-term logistically there is a great demand here we have a vast supply there. in the short-term not as the fifth year solution the five-year. was just give it to you. remember energy security that is talked about, is your best ally but not according to president obama which is like mom. the fed is an issue you have to spend the money overseas to secure oil if we turn on the tap that is not necessary then you can downsize. if that is really the line we are the solution. >> we're working on a plan for cars to run on maple syrup. we do continue to build oil pipelines but will run maple syrup th
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 5:00am EDT
according to the u.s. census. because of a clue. what to me to put this will, there's simple steps. have they photo id to present at the polls and clean up absentee balloting. absentee ballots of the to a choice because you can register, applied for a ballot, then, and in many cases never have to present himself. kansas has been very good form. often require the you have a legitimate excuse to ask for an absentee ballot. they should make an effort to vote on election day. the few votes to early you have people voting before the last debate stiffeners. in addition, when you apply you have to give them the last four digits of his social security number, and that has reduced from dramatically. we are told this is the other suppression. we're told this is a return to the jim crow laws. well, frankly 80 percent of americans support the total idea pools. the thomas is a high percentage for any issue, even high and another that your humble pie because people are estranged and some people. chieftains of hispanics and african-americans support photo id. in fact, rasmussen asked, they believe and
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 7:00pm EDT
groundbreaking series sandman-- [applause] >> selected a large number of u.s. awards and 75 issue run. >> is at city hall today and one woman said that i have every single one of those. including three harvey awards. in 1991, sandman became the first comic ever to receive a literary award. it won an award for the best short story. mr. neil gaiman is credited with being one of the creators of modern comics, as well as an author that has reached across genres to reach audiences of all ages. he is listed in the dictionary of literary biography is one of the top 10 postmodern writers in the prolific creator poetry and prose, film, journalism, comics and drama. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in giving a fairfax welcome to neil gaiman. [applause] [cheers] [applause] [cheers] [cheers] [applause] >> hello. okay, so the plan. the plan for this evening. there is one. although i only decided what was about four minutes ago. so there is a plan. the plan is as follows. i could not decide whether to read you something from my new novel, which is called "the ocean at the end of the lane."
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
. professor smith is written for u.s. times, "usa today" and other national publications and has been a frequent guest on npr, bbc and broadcast television. he recently addressed to g 20s, bbc and broadcast television. he recently addressed to g 20s and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, and he is cofounder of the new england institute for cognitive science, an evolutionary study. religious studies at the university of very good. he's been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way in the world, even though that way is often not pretty. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware, and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition and into the conditions, some humans play some others, we present him the anisfield-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ the night this is wonderful and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i am going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which d
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 5:00pm EDT
candidate for u.s. senate, goes to washington. he's already 6 feet tall and strives to the front of the line when they go to the white house to see president kennedy. and then kennedy finishes his speech. bill clinton comes forward and get his picture taken alongside john f. kennedy. he is so proud and he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person that is hindering complete honor to his family. by the age of 17 he already is planning to be elected the attorney general of arkansas, governor of arkansas and then president of the united states. this is something that everyone who knows him knows about because he talks about all the time he doesn't go to the university of arkansas he goes to georgetown and becomes the arkansas candidate for the fellowship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother direct him to our the beauty queens, the ones that offer, who are attractive and that is where his i has been. so he comes back to law school. t
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 4:00am EDT
kennedy is sitting at a table with robert morgan who is the u.s. attorney for new york and two things happen simultaneously. i spoke to morgan. all of a sudden he saw the house being repainted. there was a guy on the ladder painting and all of a sudden hes the short wave radio transistor radio they called it then to his fear and comes, ladder and starts to run towards us as fast as he can and at that moment the telephone rings on the table on the other side of the swimming pool and ethel kennedy gets the answers and says to robert kennedy it is j. edgar hoover and it is hoover telling robert kennedy that his brother has been hit and probably killed. we know on this plane johnson went in to president kennedy's bed room and made a call to robert kennedy. he asks for details of being sworn in and the exact wording of the vote you should take as president. now you are saying is johnson taking revenge for all the humiliations that robert kennedy inflicted on him when he was vice president? was there some other motive? we don't know. i certainly don't know. robert kennedy puts in his deputy
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00am EDT
? banks in the u.s. and washington? did i get that right? does that make sense to you? >> how did the -- we lost our biggest financial institution. jpmorgan took over. we only have a major bank headquartered here anymore. so, what were the consequences of that beyond the ecosystem that was thousands of employees and vendors and so forth? >> of course in the seattle area it was just a massive loss and massive affect, but as you pointed out, though too big to fail institutions got bigger, so now instead of this bank that had been integrated into seattle in this area is gone, and we have five banks that are controlling most of the assets in this country. >> and they are not here. they don't contribute to the community the same way. [laughter] the fcc if i read this right captured regulators in a mess so what is to be done? >> if we head the solution i don't know what i would be doing that may be in the next book i don't really know what the solution is. they are having trouble passing dodd-frank which is the financial reform, and it seems like even with more regulators in place we are no
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 12:45am EDT
been left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with their parents. we don't talk about how immigration breaks up families and how you know, it takes a toll on the whole family. so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this, because you know, it's an experience that definitely scarred me that has really shaped the woman who i am today. and also the experience right now with the young undocumented people who are fighting to get legal status. in terms of giving people an insight into what their situation might be like, and i touch upon the fact that my family and affected from the amnesty of 1986. i had a green card by the time i was 14 so the moment i got my green card, the whole world just opened up to me and there were so many possibilities that came my way. i was able to jump on them because they had a green card and i would really love to see this happen through the dreamers, for us to give them that chance to pursue their dreams, and to also get back to society. because, they will pay everything back. the way i have been paying back, through my writi
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 1:15pm EDT
interviewed as part of book tv college series. it's just under 20 minutes. >> u.s. naval academy professor wayne hsieh "west pointers and the civil war" the name of your book. the old army in the war and peace is the subtitle. first of all, what you mean by the old army? >> the old army is a term commonly used by historians. actually from the time period referring to the indian army, the indian fighting army. there's a joke he told army is the army before every war. there's a bunch of old armies. my book actually starts really with a professional was asian of the american army after the war of 1812 enzus. so it's about how that process occurs and the old army how that plays out in the civil war. >> give us a snapshot of what the old army prior to the war of 1812 was like. >> the old army before the war f-18 12th and this is going on the historical literature, the army before the war of 1812 was nonprofessional. the officer corps is mostly obtained positions through political influence at part of the american political patronage system and as a consequence they are not because the
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 8:30am EDT
>> and now, members of the first post-9/11 u.s. naval graduating class talk about their experience serving in iraq and afghanistan. this event held on september 11, 2012 is hosted by the navy memorial here in washington d.c. it's just under an hour. [applause] the mac thanks to all my classmates and coeditors and mentors who helped make this possible. in february to the night vision this book. everything is happening for me as an active-duty salt and afghanistan in kandahar. i was working for general nick nicholson, doing cool things is a swell stansell are now, supporting my country. maybe i should do a book. really, compared to ben wagner? really, compared to jacob sabe? and f-18 pilot to saved the stryker battalion. well, made cbs colleague, jason jackson. the story of this book were exceptional and i that i will ask us present at 2002 it could connect the stories come from personalities together to weave together a book that could define this decade through leadership ones. so i called carol andersen. carol andersen wasserstein richard in a helicopter accident. i called her on
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 10:00pm EDT
which obliged to apply strictly supreme court precedent the courts in texas, and for all u.s. court of appeals for the fifth circuit both held that the and university of texas plan which was modeled on the university of michigan will school that had been of help in 2003 that had followed the university of michigan plan closely enough so the court was obliged to uphold it. even won justice who said he hated racial preferences and would love to strike them down said that he had no choice but to pull this one as a matter of supreme court precedent. wide awake on seven of the of the 16 justices disagreed and thought that you could strike it down under the precedent. so the case finds its way to the supreme court, and it's likely i think to perhaps become the most important case in the history of racial preferences not so much because there's anything that extraordinary about this case that because the composition of the court has changed since the 2003 case which gave a fairly green light to racial preferences, very large racial preferences as long as they are camouflaged but not to be in
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 3:15pm EDT
been deeply involved in domestic surveillance elsewhere as a result of hearings before the u.s. congress, a lot of information had come out. and i knew we berkeley had beena hotbed of student protests during the '60s, so i was very intrigued to know what was the fbi up to behind the scenes at berkeley. so i looked at these documents and consulted with people about them and wrote several stories for the daily cal looking at the fbi's activities concerning the free speech movement and also an anti-war group called the vietnam day committee. but in researching those stories, i realized that there was much more there. i could see that there were many more fbi files that had yet to be released. so even before i had finished those stories, i submitted a much-expanded freedom of information act request that sought information on more than 100 different organizations and individuals, very specifically requesting certain categories of records. i thought i'd get these records in maybe a year or so and finish up the project and move on to the next story. i had no idea that i was embarking
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 5:45am EDT
general rule, u.s. north korea policy follows a very similar and repetitive pattern. the provocations by the regime, missile launches, underground nuclear test or the occasional thinking of south korean boat. they are followed by threats of sanction by the international community. a lot of hand wringing. as with the child, the province of better behavior whereupon the international community comes back and provides more aid to the regime. in many respects continuing to prop up the regime. and of course, the aid that is received almost never reaches the people for whom it is delawares end. it is sei phoned off by the military. sold on the black market for hard current sei. this races several questions. i want to plant a few seeds we can come back to. four particular areas i think are worth discussing and thinking about. one is the effect, if any, of sanctions monetary sanctions on a regime like this? well, we all remember what happened about six or seven years ago when the united states froze 25 million of north korean assets in the asia issue. an enormous impact encode. it was largely
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 11:00pm EDT
determination to offer women protection. u.s. soldiers the love of liberty was different from british charity per growth through 1815 cities and towns across the nation through dinners and dances in honor of jackson. he attended many of these. as a victory tour. celebrating the coming of peace to repeat them at -- the myth of jackson saved the women of the country from rape. celebrants offered a toast with the feelings of patriotism and duty opposed to the watchword of beauty and beauty. jackson would raise his glass. the myth became over and into the national fabric. popular song said paradise how new orleans is aimed to wealth and beauty there is girls and of every hue. so if he was lucky he had the girls and cotton bags in spite of old kentucky. interestingly the story of beauty and beauty show white men and black men of new orleans fighting side-by-side to protect women of every hue from gaining style attacks of british forces. contemporaries celebrated jackson's victory to make claims the british had claimed to target black and white women alike. the some close at the british took to fli
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
-born conrad who happened to be a u.s. navy veteran world war with. white secretary and upstair office windows kept extending thumbs down signs said baldwin to the marchers until suddenly many of them saw the stunningly handsome, idol harry bell phone nay in the crowd. [laughter] when they saw the beautiful cat, they demonstrated that america was the most desperately schizophrenic of a republican. [laughter] [applause] baldwin's story telling prose in the insight were never in better form. it was vintage james baldwin, race, sex and country. all on extraordinary display subject to his scorching ironic pin. those young win in the window, quote, could only look forward to an alliance with one of the businessmen. and they were, he said, female. a word which in the context of the color curtain has suffered the same fate as the word male. baldwin did not miss his chance. when the girls saw hare a collision occurred in them so visible to be at once funny and sad. at one moment the thumbs were down, they were barricaded within their skins. at the next moment, those downturned thumbs fl
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 7:00am EDT
the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you. i also have the distinction that i read and commented on stewart -- john stuart's book. no one has come after me today. the biggest incendiary, you should have read the draft i read. i am one of the few lawyers who practices in front of the supreme court who did not file a brief in the fisher case. let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative-action. the question in this case is the university of texas violated the equal protection clause in connection with undergraduate admission programs and abigail fisher when she was injured by what the university of texas did? i want to start by explaining a little more than stuart did about the admission program and what it is supposed to do and what it is not supposed to do and what it does or doesn't do so we have the top 10%. this guarantees anyone who graduates in the top 10% of their high school class in texas, admission to the university of texas. it
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 8:00pm EDT
so that is the overall efficiency and increase, .23 miles per gallon. is save the u.s. an estimated 12,000 barrels of oil per day that we used 9 million barrels of oil per day so this is a literal drop in the bucket. there was a short-term bruised and car sales followed by a quick drop off, no long-term increase in car sales and the cost to the taxpayer was $24,000 per car. i am not an economist but that sounds like a lot of cars. >> adding to it insults and injuries he brought up the price of used cars so eradicated whatever benefit there was. >> about the other thing, there are carbon emissions in building new cars and we we took old cars and smashed them. and then barack obama also ignored, we also know one of the common complaints that george bush consistently put in the mode of it industry and above the motive of the epa because he was big boy is -- of -- big oil and big business and you know the rigmarole. barack obama did the exact same thing. the epa said we need to decrease fog levels because fog is killing people and barack obama said no its it's not good for business so h
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 10:00am EDT
efforts to rescue u.s. and afghan soldiers rescued by taliban force is. for his actions mr. meyer became the first living marine to win a medal of honor since the vietnam war. this is about 45 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> i would like to welcome everybody. this is my more official welcome. we are honored to have you here today. i am chairman of the in the league club author's group. and to have all of you here today. we have a couple tables from our american legion post here. so everybody knows who you are. and the american legion post. .. >> so whether it was books or dvds or cds or even ipods, batteries, some of the things that they'd let us know that they needed, and we collected a few boxes and sent them to the troops. each year it's gotten bigger and bigger and bigger, and i think last year we sent over 300 boxes to the troops, and we collected a lot of money which, of course, if you come to the event and you haven't brought a set of batteries, you don't need to feel bad because we have, like, $25 bags, $50 bags, $100 bags, $40,000 bags if you want to bring that. and
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 8:00am EDT
that's -- generally, that's how the fbi works on those sorts of things in the u.s. attorney's office. they're not, you know, they're looking -- again, this sort of investigation they're looking to go after elected officials if they're up to no good. >> yes. >> kind of along the same line, i was just wondering the dynamic between the two. she's grown up with a very powerful father and kind of knows the ins and outs and almost, you know, is a great training guide for him, um, their kind of kindred spirits and desire maybe to both be narcissistic as well as driven. do you think she was much more of a mastermind on some of the ways and maybe the ways to hide money or, you know, through either her businesses, um, the way that it's all kind of gone out? because if he's not really the mental giant of the group, she might have been the mastermind, i mean, what are your thoughts on that? >> yeah. i don't think if she was the mastermind. she was, she's on, i mean, you know, when you read the book, you see her on these tapes a lot. i mean, she was the person he probably talked to more than anyb
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 1:15pm EDT
archbishop of canterbury -- >> american hostages in lebanon and initially i was asked by the u.s. authority not to visit the united states while there were hostages in lebanon because there were negotiations to get them out and they didn't want to. to be fair, the day the last american hostage was freed and brought to safety the americans said there was no longer a problem. i could come whenever i wanted. they kept their word. this is the thing about meeting strange people. there is an official. don't know if he does the job now but there is an official probably in washington who is the counterterrorism chief, that is an official which holds the rank of ambassador, the job is so secret that while he is doing the job, you can't say where he lives and can't describe any of his movements and yet he runs the whole counterterrorism operation of the united states and i met three of them, these invisible men. i could write one hell of a spy novel. it was one of them who asked me not to visit the united states and another of them who said i could come and i was able to come the first time i came he
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:30am EDT
how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war, the army expanded to, you know, 3 million people, two and a half million or so in the north, and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary, and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts, treasonnist behavior and so on. although, he didn't pursue every case or serve on every case himself, obviously, a lot of court marshalls on the field and so on, it was his responsibility to make sure as much as he could justice was prevailing in the cases and that punishment was meeted out as it should be and people's rights were protected. it is a massive assignment way past the end of the war. he stayed in that position until 1875 so-dramatically expanded position, and he also had the role in that position of making law, so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war of the likes which the united states had never seen. to many, many policies around how the war should be conducted and so it needed to be created, and he was influential there, and
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:45am EDT
corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the development of tech
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 2:00pm EDT
started to see it as early as 2006. and the reason is this. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq, which was serious and opposed in syria was turning a blind life is not helping jihad discussed the area into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there's a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say they were next on the hit list, so they were doing everything they could to help make this happen. there's one high-level syrian official told me later on, of course we were helping them across. you know what? we wanted you guys to kill them. that's why we wanted to go because we wanted these guys to kill you guys. we don't want them in our country. unfortunately they killed a lot of our boys. when he survived and particularly after the assassination of former lebanese rafik hariri, that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria and people in late 2005 were counting the days for the assad regime. the expatriates, organization just waiting to move in one assad fell. but th
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 8:00am EDT
century of u.s. independence britain's and americans had chased each other about questions about population, its regulation, its limitation, its optimization. even as white americans claimed to need enslaved americans and african-americans to their labor force they coveted indian lands to cover the nation's people. british interfered with and criticized u.s. plans on both counts. on the continent british continued to cultivate diplomatic and economic ties to native americans supporting the rival population from who the united states perceived the greatest threat. on the ocean britain controlled atlantic shipping forbidding the atlantic slave trade after 1807 and harassing u.s. merchant vessels. meanwhile at sea britain's traditional goal of population limitation because usually british it fought on their small aisle, their main worry was too many worry but on the seas the royal navy needed every hand it could find on deck. the consequent british practice of boarding american ships to round up having a bound british seamen provoked enormous controversy more so because the efforts
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 1:00pm EDT
bunch of very basic kids reading books to cambodia because the u.s. military is teaching cambodians how to speak english and they're going to be reading see spot run, or the updated versions of the sorts of things. so we are finding all over the world people want to learn english. >> host: so if people want to donate to your project, wooster website? >> guest: www..e. a g -- mid-bucks.org. >> host: we've been talking with stephen frantzich, this is his most recent book, someday. we are at the naval academy. this is booktv on c-span. >> in an interview at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, aaron o'connell talked about the history of the u.s. marine corps. it's about 15 minutes. >> host: welcome as part of the tvs university series and would like to visit campuses across the country and talk with professors who are also authors. this week, we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland. joining us is professor aaron o'connell, who is also the author of this book, "underdogs: the making of the modern marine
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 1:15am EDT
correctly. you under the obama administration the u.s. experienced a morbid of the infrastructure of the economy, the public sector become a manipulative force intervenes in the financial sectors with gowrn tee that attract talent and -- [inaudible] >> the worst this is the grain cast of the obama administration. and the epa now has a game control over [inaudible] has deemed a po lou assistant, danger to the environment. and co2 is the manhattan and keeps us alive. the circle of life and attempt to oppress co2 epitomizes the kind of antinature, antiimper prize spirit of the administration. it's the reason we need another supply side of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty." >> i would have changed quite a lot. i mean, there. all kind of detail that have changed. but i found that do try to change one thing would be to change everything. so, you know, you have in to a bunch of editorial work. instead of changing it, i essentially retained the old book and added 30,000 new words at the beginning and end. and
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:45am EDT
in the u.s. come here in washington, d.c. wide? because they wanted to send a message. and for that matter, i hope that the united states of america, and whoever will be elected, will take a leadership decision, maybe it's not popular that it will be a moral decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. and i don't know how many of you have followed the weekly reports, and what was written there, but something very interesting popped up from the report. when you go into look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
other side of the mountains, and during that time, my parents were gone working here in the u.s.. i looked at the mountains and think my parents were over there, on the other side of those mountains. that was that to me. >> host: originally, where were you born? >> guest: in mexico, southern mexico in a little city that no one heard of, but when i mention alcapaco, everybody knows that. it was three hours from there. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came here in 1997 when i was two years old, and he send for my mother a few years later in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states? >> guest: i came to the united states in 198 # 5. >> host: how old were you? >> guest: in may of 1985, nine and a half going on ten. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your trek? >> guest: well, i had been separated from my father for eight years so when he returned to mexico in 1985, we convinced him to bring us back here. he was not coming back to mexico,
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 1:40am EDT
president to be elected under the system we know well, in which the candidates attracted to a u.s. and new hampshire, and they submit their feet to the will of the people. and in a series of primaries and caucuses they are the chairs and nominees are selected. before jimmy carter, presidential candidates were chosen by insiders at the national conventions. and they could run in the primaries and the caucus but they didn't necessarily have to. it was an inside game. presidents now must raise a lot of money to take their money to their case to the people in the way that they didn't need to before. and in terms of the travel and the president's focusing on the key states, you have presidents now who are key to the political success taking their case to the people and now that you're in the office, they have continued to do so as president.o in the book i talk about examples of the presidential aide saying when a president needs to get back to his winning a game or does he want to do? he wants to go back to the people and the have and to do it in the key electoral states that better dispropor
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia officer antonio mendez hosing as a hollywood producer scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 5:30am EDT
as low as it is. and if people stop trusting u.s. treasuries, the $16 trillion of debt we have out there, interest rates are going to skyrocket, interest payments will go up annually potentially by hundreds of billions of dollars, then we would have more deficit, there would be less trust. and so you haven't -- you've wrecked the government's role in the economy. those are my secret notes, i'm going to ping -- pick them up. [laughter] so you have to stabilize that. and you have to figure out a way to get the economy to grow. and that's a long-term proposition which will lead to more jobs. but you're right, there's some contradictions in all of this. but in trying to create more jobs, you can't mess up with the overall problem of the trustworthiness and creditworthiness. you're shaking your head. we'll talk afterwards. next. >> hi. over the course of your career, you've had the most incredible access to all these, um, great politicians in history and even today, and i was just wondering out of everyone you've met, who surprised you the most? who is like the least like how they are p
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 11:30pm EDT
ground. >> host: can you give us an example, the network of the u.s., how it exists? >> guest: after the invasion of iraq, one of the major construction or reconstruction quote-on-quote ventures was, you know, commissioned somehow or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network, for instance, vice president dick cheney, whether it's haliburton, other countries, ended up unfairly taking up the ventures, and, actually, they didn't do a good job at all as a virtue of the results we saw years later. they ended on scandals, and other kinds of such networks. if you'd like to look at a much bigger scale, the entire $700 billion to $800 billion bailout is a quote-on-quote state business network that operates allowing our system to bail out people who caused a problem under legal pretense. the issue is in countries like syria, money is smaller, and the checks and balances whether it's the media or the democratic process, which is absent, and other civil society associations and power centers is completely absent so the price smaller, it's di
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 1:40pm EDT
come 1861, by 1861 did the u.s. for the south professional armies? >> they did. it's very small and successful as a place where you see it happen its greatest success. but the problem is in 1861 it's a little over 16,000 officers and the officer corps will split so there is a professional army that is very small and has to be dispersed again and for that reason the early american armies in the civil war are actually quite poor really in their proficiency. they learn quickly but they learned the hard way, and that's one of the reason west point is catapulted to prominence because they are the only people with any kind of expertise and they immediately rely on very quickly and therefore they are given a disproportionate amount of influence but the irony again is that most of the -- de conquer during the mexico can pan with an army that's usually about 104,011,000. this is the third of the size of the army much smaller dvr me you see at places like gettysburg and scott is the only person that has much experience and by the time of the civil war he's too old to take the field. all of th
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 11:00pm EDT
instruments, totally different from the instruments we use today. i began to look into the u.s. the industry it was gigantic there is a piano in every home. it was hugely profitable interesting debate to industry. a major part of the economy. well at some point it became a longer economically feasible for them to be manufacturing in the u.s. and the move to japan and korea. now china is a major manufacturer but there was no panic. i don't recall anybody panicking about pianos are leaving in the u.s. and we are outsourcing our piano and losing jobs. no it is just part of the normal market process that takes place. part of the economic development. we have to let itself played out. and i discussed the piano industry in the industry and panic we can't possibly have prosperity as long as the u.s. is not manufacturing the cars we drive but that's ridiculous. i have personal regrets about that because i like the u.s. piano. i like the american piano. we just have to defer that result. and by the way i was just in brazil. they drive a lot of american cars the you know what, they are not ma
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 11:00am EDT
unfortunate timing of the jobs bill that passed when the u.s. was hemorrhaging a hundred thousand jobs a month. the financial if quake had hit with the economic tsunami hadn't hit the tour. fortunately in 2010 i was 1,000 miles away and pretty oblivious to the prevailing stimulus narrative but i did become aware because i write about the environment that the stimulus included $90 billion for clean energy leveraging another $100 billion in private capital. it seems like tycos. the united states was spending billion a year on clean energy before the recovery act. in 1999 washington completely knocked president clinton's high in the sky plan to spend $6 billion for clean energy. was dead on arrival. obama got $90 billion in his first months before his staff could find bathrooms in the west wing. just ridiculous. the stimulus was pouring unprecedented rivers of cash and renewables and energy efficiency and every imaginable form, advanced biofuel and electric vehicles and cutting edge research, smarter grid, cleaner coal, factories to make that green stuff in the united states. it was by far
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 3:00pm EDT
, today, my books sit on the shelf of the u.s. library of congress. the largest library in the world. today -- [applause] -- today high schools right across this nation, from east to west, from north to south, fill my e-mail inbox with speaking requests. today my message of inspiration is being broadcast into the living rooms of over 100 million households, right across the continental united states. that's what happens when you put your mind to something. that's what happens when your audience is open and disinterested in reputation or conformity, and committed to individualism and the act of being bold. today the idealized american can count his true friends on just one hand. uncompromising and simplistic convictions such as the belief in good and evil, in righteousness and wickedness, make him a marked man. clarity is the enemy of the highly sensitized and the meek. silence even disagreement is their friend. to them your and my, our contributions are not only unwelcome, they're intemperate, irritable, and inflammatory. from the prairies of able to the river banks of missouri to ri
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
became president but he signed things u.s. grand. i don't know if there is a memory of my own childhood that grew me to grant but in the neighborhood i grew up in, in portland, ore. there was a public park and the sign on the public park was u.s. grant park. for the longest time i thought this was the federally owned park granted to the city for some reason or other. that is part of the answer. the other answer is i had a hard time convincing the people who designed the dust jacket to get all the words on there that are already on their. the man who -- "the man who saved the union," ulysses grant, the man who saved the union war and peace is a lot of words and especially with a photograph. i didn't want to push things. one last thing. ulysses grant sort of rolls off the tongue. add an s, ulysses s. grant, it really wasn't an oversight. it was by design. >> a more substantive question about the title. it is called "the man who saved the union". i get that, he was the general who turned the tide of the civil war, saving the union but what i didn't know until i read the book, the work of s
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 2:45pm EDT
presidency is the most divisive in u.s. history and says the president has allowed his ideology to trump the good of the populace. is a little under an hour. >> good afternoon, everyone. i am the president of the clear blue loose policy institute and i thank you for joining us and welcome you to our conservative woman's network. special thanks to the heritage foundation. we have been putting this on for years ended to a pleasure to work with a fine organization like the heritage foundation. i am happy to introduce today's speaker, kate obenshain. you have seen her on fox news where she is a passionate, articulate defender of conservative values and has one of the loose policy institute's most popular campus speakers for many years and she has been speaking and mentoring young women that we worked with for decades and helped me out so many times to help the institute, and i am grateful to you for that. she has also been in almost all of our great conservative women calendars. our 2013 calendar is out. we do it differently with not only beautiful women but beautiful scenes from march
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 6:00pm EDT
to the u.s.. the author recounts the development for initial proposal of construction in the 1800 to the day it opened on october 26th, 1825. this is about 40 minutes. >> i'm going to talk for 30 minutes, # and then we'll have time for a few minutes of q&a afterwards. it was not my idea to write this book. an editor asked the agent if he knew someone who could write a book. my agent said yes. the guy had written the box about new york city's water history, and the editor said great, editor called me, and i said, "why"? what is there new to write about a canal? can one make history out of iconic folklore? one was written in decades for children, an indication that the subject is not fertile ground for adult readers. my agent answered the question "why" by saying when a major publisher wants to pay you money for your second book, you just say yes, and so i did say "yes" after resolving the issue of a contract for a different book, but i began to answer the "why" question myself and there were new stories to tell, new ways to tell old stories about erie and myth busting to be done as
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 11:00am EDT
to the u.s. supreme court decision. the u.s. supreme court reversed the decisions of communism party leaders on the ground it was not illegal just to be in the communist party. the government had to show members were actively involved in trying to illegally overthrow the government so this put a big crimp in hoover's operations. he began cointel program aimed as disrupting people. it was focused on the communism party. the second one that started was on the socialism workers party, another one on the new left, another one on white hate group, and another on what the fbi called black nationalist hate groups, and in the files concerns the university of california, you do see cointel prodocuments where the fbi goes beyond information to use that to disrupt people like savoi engaged in nonviolent, civil disobedience. >> hi, my name's guy. over here -- how are you doing. i just had a question -- i was involved with the occupy movement for a little while, and not necessarily here at berkeley, but oakland, and i wanted to hear, like, about any parallels you see if you follow the occupy move
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 10:30am EDT
across the country and talk with professors who are also authors. this week were at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland and joining us is professor aaron o'connell, who is the author of this book, "underdogs: the making of the modern marine corps". professor o'connell, when was the marine corps established? >> the marine corps was established in 1775, but it's something of a myth.??? marines always claim n-november 1775, but that's actually the date that congress authorized the creation of the marine corps. they never raised the battalion? of the continental congress allowed for. >> one were battalions raised? >> they never were. but the first went into new uniform on november 10th. it's still celebrated the world over as the marine corps birthday. >> what was the marine corps' reputation? >> the job originally was to be the guys on ship quite frankly. they protected officers from the crew. it was a pretty difficult thing to sail a ship in the 18th century, so that people there people there to enforce. so the marines principal job is they would also serve as neighb
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:30pm EDT
which is about the children who get left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with their parents, and we don't talk about how immigration breaks up families and how, you know, it takes a toll on the whole family so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this because, you know, it's something that is up -- inexperienced, that scared me, and that shaped me to the woman who i am today. right now, with the dreamers, with the young undocumented people who are fighting to get their legal status, i felt it was an important story -- in terms of giving people an insight into what their situation might be like, and i touch upon the fact that, you know, my family benefited from the am nighsty of 1986. i had a green card by the time i was 14 so the moment i got my green card, you know, the whole world opened up to me, and there were so many possibilities that came my way that i was able to jump on because i had a green card, and i really really like to see this happen to the dreamers, you know, for us to give them that chance to pursue their dreams, to give back to so
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 1:45pm EDT
u.s. tim, do you believe in this, this, this. they say, yes to yes, yes. well, you know, your a feminist. the label is a problem. many women don't want to use the label, don't want to send signals that are associated with the label because they know their is a group of voters out there who don't see it the way it our generation sought. >> time for one last question, i think. you have had your hand of says the very beginning of the q&a session. >> how does rate and is this the -- at this city intersects? are there additional challenges the woman of color might face? >> you know, when shirley ran for president she in 1972 said that voters were more sexist and racist. i think that thinking still holding chair today. and not sure of my colleagues have a sense of idea on that. you mentioned nikky haley having an ethnic advantage combe. kaifu. >> i don't want to expand on that. this is a difficult question because if people of color want to say no, i think that in politics ethnicity and race are no less of an issue. at the sexual orientation is a big issue. that is an incredible hurdl
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